Don’t Stand Too Close to a Naked Man [Hardcover] Tim Allen -
Don’t Stand Too Close to a Naked Man [Hardcover] Tim Allen -
Don’t Stand Too Close to a Naked Man [Hardcover] Tim Allen -
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Don't Stand Too Close to a Naked Man [Hardcover] Tim Allen

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Product Description The comic who's a guy's guy is now a bookseller's dream. The star of ABC's Home Improvement, the #1 show on television, Tim Allen has written the book millions have been awaiting--the naked truth about his outlook on life, love, and lathes. Allen's movie debut this November in The Santa Clause is certain to generate additional media attention. Line drawings. From Publishers Weekly Allen is best known as the lead actor in the TV comedy series Home Improvement. Here his approach is mostly humorous with a few serious essays. It quickly becomes clear that he honed his talents in venues frequented by the 18-30 age cohort, for he concentrates on the differences between men and women in such areas as sex, clothes, hobbies, friends and reactions to the environment. Some of the selections are entertaining, like the one about changing his original surname, Dick. Others, like "More Power," about tools, are markedly less so. The humor is a strange amalgam of the callow and the sophisticated and the result is only intermittently funny, and then only mildly so. 500,000 first printing; first serial to TV Guide and Playboy. Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. From Booklist This is another differences-between-the-sexes-har-har book, and we can't get enough of those, can we? Its advantage vis-{…}a-vis the others is that it is written by Allen more or less in the persona of his character in the TV sitcom, Home Improvement. Unfortunately, it is to a large degree an extended routine that Allen does very well but that features nothing new or really insightful. Such an Allen insight as "It's a man's place to pretend something doesn't hurt" typifies the tenor here, as does the extremely brief chapter "The Secrets Men Never Tell Women," which consists of a single throwaway punch line. As comedy, this has the disadvantage of being static and scripted; as literature, the disadvantage of covering familiar territory familiarly. Oh, it's still funny but probably considerably more so to fans of Allen and his popular TV show than to other readers. Mike Tribby From Kirkus Reviews The spawn of Seinlanguage: shticky meditations by a stand-up comic who now stars in a top-rated television show. As Tim Taylor, Allen is the focal point of Home Improvement, but his manly-man persona plays off his wife, ``Tool Time'' cohorts, and other characters. Here we have Allen solo, closer to the stand-up mode, musing ``about many things I want to say about being a man.'' His short chapters mainly consist of riffs on his past, his humor safely in the middle American mainstream. Born Timothy Allen Dick, he learned to cope with his unusual moniker through humor and thus segues into observations genitalistic. Allen resents women saying men's cars are linked to their penises: ``What's an extension of the vagina--a purse?'' His life was transformed, he writes, by a Playboy centerfold, and he does have some wise thoughts on objectification: ``If we could have had sex with our cars and boats, it would have been a lot easier. But we'd be a smaller species.'' What should men ``look for in a gal? The answer is easy: breath.'' Allen balances such cheap laughs with some insights, suggesting that women, like men, seek glitz in a partner but eventually settle for ``the family station wagon.'' There's more: marriage, sports, and, of course, tools, leading to his innovative analysis of the impact of tool belts on butt cracks. He ends with some heartfelt sentiments on fatherhood. Allen only briefly touches on the traumas that have fueled his psyche: the death of his father in a car wreck when Tim was 11 and a prison sentence for selling drugs. (The lack of privacy in prison supplies the book's title.) More memoir and less shtick might have been a better balance here. For loyal fans, who should still be plentiful. (First printing of 500,000; first serial to TV Guide and Playboy) -- Copyright ©1994, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. About